Featured Artists

We’re proud to represent the work of Canadian ceramic artists, including both established names and up-and-coming artists.

Susan Card

Card’s ceramic pieces are formed and sculpted, then painted in a watercolour style with glazes and underglazes. Her work acknowledges the tradition of floral symbolism in art that signifies feminine beauty, fertility, and the natural and philosophical worlds, and elevates the everyday to the contemplative.

Célia Brandão

Brandão is interested in balancing form and function and imbues her organic forms with unaffected simplicity.

Eden Bender

Bender’s sculpture is both conceptual and figurative. It often relies on scale to draw the observer into a surreal world of transformation, metamorphosis, a world where unusual juxtaposition of static and dynamic is the norm.

Wayne Cardinalli

Wayne Cardinalli has been a full-time potter since 1969 when he graduated from Temple University’s Tyler School of Art with an M.F.A. Degree in Ceramics.  His work has been featured in various publications, including Ceramics Monthly Magazine.

Shu-Chen Cheng

“From earth to heaven” - using clay and glazes, Cheng creates surfaces and textures on vessels that reflect cosmic images.

Yumiko Katsuya

Katsuya is fascinated with the natural patterns, mysterious colours, and sense of translucent depth in crystalline glazes. She has a passion for creating functional art, particularly teapots, vases, dishes, and Japanese Tea Ceremony utensils.

Gabrielle Kauffman

Kauffman specializes in functional wheel-thrown stoneware. She works with overlapping glazes and wax resist to achieve richly coloured, soothing, and unpredictable results

Margie Kelk

Kelk's artistic practice reflects contemporary concerns about cultural history and politics. She takes an exploratory and experimental approach to reconstructing visual fragments of ideas through diverse media.

Irit Lepkin

Lepkin engages in an artistic duet with her earthenware pieces, which are meant to accentuate mixed messages. The juxtaposition of soft clay with metaphorical harshness of reality underscores what she terms “the inescapable psychological condition of modernity.”

Eiko Maeda

Maeda works in nerikomi, a traditional Japanese hand-building technique that involves stacking, slicing, and re-forming coloured clay to form repeating patterns.

Dale Mark

Mark is known for his slip-decorated, reduction-fired, functional pieces. He enjoys the translucency of the porcelain, the quality of glazes, and the feel of the clay when throwing.

Marney McDiarmid

McDiarmid uses found materials and photographs to build pieces that tell stories and flirt with practicality. Her vessels are phenomenally light and often translucent, encouraging the people who hold them to slow down and find pleasure in the small details of everyday life.

Lesley McInally

“Landscape, seascape, weather and it’s effects have always had an enormous influence on my work.” McInally uses historical printmaking techniques, layering ceramic pigments and hand-coloured porcelain engobes to create complex textural surfaces that reveal hidden bursts of colour on soft, rounded forms, like weathered boulders.

Heidi McKenzie

McKenzie maintains both sculpture and functional ware studio practices. Her work engages issues of identity and belonging.

Mary Philpott

Philpott creates intricate hand-pressed tiles and unique sculptural pieces reflecting animal and avian life.

Ann Marie Row

Row is passionate about the effect of traditional wood firing on the surface of her works in clay, which encompass both functional and sculptural forms.

Emma Smith

Smith’s wood-fired functional and sculptural work are reflections of a simple, beautiful life - quietly providing utility for a shared meal, or embracing freshly picked flowers on the windowsill. Her work is inspired by solitude, community and family dynamics – the experiences that shape the way we see the world, the people who come in and out of our lives, and the physical spaces that form the backdrop of our memories.

Chris Sora

Sora pursues his curiosity about his Japanese heritage through pottery. Functional work is his primary medium of expression, but he also produces wearable and sculptural pieces.

Robert Tetu

Tetu produces functional pottery of uncompromising craftsmanship and quality in stoneware and fine porcelain, and is known for his Shino glaze.